Posts Tagged ‘the list’

HitListed!

May 9, 2011

We were absolutely thrilled with the recent List Eating & Drinking Awards held on the 26th April!

Centotre was HitListed as a highly-recommended Edinburgh breakfast destination – open from 7.30 daily (10am on Sundays), Live music venue – with our Jazzmain Trio joining us again this summer for sophisticated Sunday sessions! And, for our dedication to local produce, direct trade and seasonal Scottish ingredients! Well done to all the team and thanks again to all our customers, friends, suppliers and extended Love Happy Food family for your continued support!

Read full review below…

We are also excited to celebrate our sister venue, The Scottish Cafe & Restaurant’s, HitListing as a highly-recommended Arts Venue eatery! Well done to the TSC team and a big thanks to all our wonderful customers, friends and suppliers for your support – we certainly couldn’t do it without you!

The Scottish Cafe was also highly-recommended for their top notch Breakfasts – open from 8am daily (10am on Sundays), their delicious coffee – served all day (with homemade cake if you fancy it) and the same dedicated philosophy of direct trade – sourcing fresh seasonal Scottish ingredients as locally as possible from a long list of artisan producers from all over Scotland.

CENTOTRE
103 George Street, New Town, EH2 3ES | 0131 225 1550 | www.centotre.com
Open : Monday to Thursday – 7.30am until 10pm. Friday and Saturday – 7.30am until 11pm. Sundays – 10am until 8pm (extended in the Festival). Bar open : Monday to Saturday – 7.30am until midnight. Sundays – 10am until 10pm.

Like sister establishment The Scottish Cafe and Restaurant, Centotre promises to serve ‘happy food’, their term for food made with fresh, locally sourced ingredients. True to their word, Victor and Carina Contini work with a large band of Scottish businesses and an impressive list of suppliers can be found on their website.

The interior of their George Street restaurant is also striking, a former bank with high, ornate ceilings, tall pillars and pristine white tables. Perhaps to cater for surrounding businesses Centotre opens nice and early at 7.30am for breakfast servings of pastries , rolls and even waffle dishes. The evening a la carte menu features pastas, pizza, salads and main courses. A starter of silky gnocchi is surrounded by cream, sprigs of dill and smoked salmon. A main course of venison arrives with a tangy horseradish dressing and grilled vegetables. Desserts at Centotre are worth saving room for, particularly a delightfully crunchy meringue filled with berries and cream.

+ Admirable commitment to local businesses
– Generous cream in pasta dishes might not appeal

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Supplier Special: Humphrey Errington

August 25, 2009

Humphrey Errington, also known as The Man Who Saved Scottish Cheese, was in Centotre for a visit with Victor the other day. Humphrey is one of our favourite suppliers and we are delighted to get local Scottish cheese from him.

Here’s an excerpt from the story in The List of how Humphrey saved Scotland’s favourite cheeses:

Nearly 15 years ago Humphrey Errington’s tiny but highly regarded cheesemaking operation was threatened by closure under a harshly enforced health regulation. Nicki Holmyard recalls his landmark battle.

Lanark Blue is a firm favourite on Scottish cheeseboards and without it, there might not be such a thing as a Scottish cheeseboard at all. Certainly not one where terms such as ‘farmhouse,’ ‘hand-made’ and ‘unpasteurised’ could attach themselves to the best of the selection upon it.

The man who created Lanark Blue, Humphrey Errington, farms 400 sheep near Carnwath in the Lanarkshire countryside and began making cheese in the mid-1980s as a diversification exercise to add value to his flock. In doing so he created the first new Scottish blue cheese for centuries. ‘Cheese making in the past was always a part of farming and I wanted to revive the tradition,’ he says.

By the mid-1990s, having perfected his unpasteurised cheese and found plenty of regular buyers, Errington fell foul of the local environmental health authorities, who wanted him to produce a ‘safe’ pasteurised cheese.

Problems escalated when Clydesdale Council claimed to have found Listeria monocytogenes in a sample and demanded all produce be recalled. Devastated by the news, Errington had his own tests done, the majority of which failed to find any listeria, while a few found minute amounts of a non-dangerous strain. He decided to appeal against the council’s decision and the case went to court. Legal arguments dragged on for over a year, making Errington and his flock a regular news item.

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